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Children's Shoes

Our team of specialists and staff believe that informed patients are better equipped to make decisions regarding their health and well being. For your personal use, we have created an extensive patient library covering an array of educational topics. Browse through these diagnoses and treatments to learn more about topics of interest to you. Or, for a more comprehensive search of our entire Web site, enter your term(s) in the search bar provided.

As always, you can contact our office to answer any questions or concerns.

What is a Foot and Ankle Surgeon?

When to Call A Doctor
 


Foot Problems

General Statistics


Achilles Problems

Achilles Tendonitis | Peroneal Tendon Dislocation| Xanthomas of the Achilles Tendon


Ankle Problems

Ankle Sprain | Chronic Lateral Ankle Pain | Osteochondritis


Arch and Ball Problems

Flat Feet | Metatarsalgia | Plantar Fibromas | Sesamoiditis


Common Foot Injuries

Ankle Sprain Injuries | Broken Ankle | Fractures | Osteochondritis | Osteochondromas | Shin Splints | Sports Injuries


Deformities

Amniotic Band Syndrome | Bunions | Claw Toe | Clubfoot | DysplasiaFlat Feet | Gordon Syndrome | Haglunds Deformity | Hallux Limitus | Hallux Rigidus | Hallux Varus | Hammertoes | Jackson Weiss Syndrome | Mallet Toes | Metatarsalgia | Osteomyelitis | Overlapping or Underlapping Toes | Peroneal Tendon Dislocation | Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction | Sesamoiditis | Spurs | Tarsal Coalition


Diabetes and Your Feet

 

Diseases of the Foot

Arthritis | Cancer | Charcot Foot | Freiberg's Disease | Gout | Kaposi's Sarcoma | Kohler's Disease | Maffucci's Syndrome | Ollier's Disease | Raynaud's Disease | Seiver's Disease


Fungus Problems

Common Fungal Problems | Athletes Foot | Fungal Nails | Other Tips | Prevention


Heel Problems

Haglunds Deformity | Heel Callus | Heel Fissures | Plantar Fasciitis


Nail Problems

Black Toenails | Ingrown Toenails | Nail Fungus


Skin Problems

Allergies | Athletes Foot | Blisters | Burning Feet | Calluses | Corns | Cysts | Frostbite | Fungus | Gangrene | Lesions | Psoriasis | Smelly Feet and Foot Odor | Swelling | Ulcers | Warts


Toe Problems

Bunions | Claw Toe | Digital Deformity | Hallux Limitus | Hallux Rigidis | Hallux Varus | Hammertoes | Intoeing | Overlapping or Underlapping Toes | Subungal Exotosis | Turf Toe


Vascular/Nerve Problems

Acrocyanosis | Alcoholic Neuropathy | Chilblains (Cold Feet) | Erythromelalgia | Ischemic Foot | Neuroma | Spasms | Venous Stasis

Overview of Feet and Ankle Problems

Basic Foot Care Guidelines

 

Medical Care

Diagnostic Procedures

Computed Tomography | MRI | Ultrasound | X-Rays


Orthotics



Pain Management

General Information and Tips | Pain Management for Specific Conditions


Surgical Procedures

General Information | Achilles Surgery | Ankle Surgery | Arthritis Surgery | Arthroscopy | Bunion Surgery | Cyst Removal | Flatfoot CorrectionHeel Surgery | Metatarsal Surgery | Nerve Surgery | Toe Surgery


Therapies

Athlete's Foot Treatment | Cryotherapy | Extracorporeal Shock Wave | Fungal Nail Treatment | Physical Therapy | Iontophoresis | Neurolysis


Fitness and Your Feet

Exercise Those Toes | Aerobics | Fitness and Your Feet | Stretching | Walking and Your Feet | Jogging and Running


Sports and Your Feet

Baseball | Basketball | Cycling | Golf | Jogging and Running | Tennis


Foot Care

Basic Foot Care Guidelines | Athletic Foot Care | Blisters | Childrens Feet | Corns and Calluses | Diabetic Foot Care | Foot Care for Seniors | Foot Self Exam | Pedicures | Your Feet at Work | Bunion Prevention | Burning Feet | Ingrown Nails | Nutrition For Your Feet


Women's Feet

High Heels | Stockings? | Pregnancy | Women Over 65


Foot Odor and Smelly Feet

Prevention | Treating Foot Odor


Shoes

Facts About Shoes | Anatomy of a Shoe | Athletic Shoe Guidelines | Children's Shoes | Corrective and Prescription Shoes | What to Look ForMen's Shoes | Women's Shoes | Your Footprint | Wear Patterns


Links

Associations/Groups | GovernmentOnline Resources

 

Choosing shoes for your children can play a critical role in their musculoskeletal development, including their posture.

In general, infants just learning to walk do not need shoes. Infants may go barefooted indoors, or wear only a pair of socks. This helps the foot grow normally and develop its muscles and strength as well as encourages the grasping ability of toes.

Once children are ready to walk as toddlers, their need for properly-fitted shoes is important. In general, a soft, pliable, roomy shoe, such as a sneaker, is ideal for all children. The toe box should provide enough space for growth and should be wide enough to allow the toes to wiggle. A finger's breadth of extra length will usually allow for about three to six months' worth of growth, though this can vary depending on your child's age and rate of growth.

Because high-top shoes tie above the ankle, they are recommended for younger children who may have trouble keeping their shoes on. Contrary to common belief, however, high-top shoes offer no advantages in terms of foot or ankle support over their low-cut counterparts.

Here are some tips when purchasing shoes for children:

  • Both feet should be measured every time you shop for new shoes since those little feet are growing. If, as is common, the feet are two different sizes, shoes should be fitted to the larger foot.
  • The child's foot should be sized while he or she is standing up with full weight-bearing.
  • There should be about one-half inch of space (or a thumb's width) between the tip of the toes and the end of the shoe. The child should be able to comfortably wiggle his or her toes in the shoe.
  • Have the child walk around the store for more than just a few minutes wearing the shoe with a normal sock. Ask the child if he or she feels any pressure spots in the shoe. Look for signs of irritation on the foot after the shoe is tested.
  • Put your hand inside the shoe and feel around for any staples or irregularities in the glue that could cause irritation. Examine where the inside stitching hits the foot.
  • Examine the shoe itself. It should have a firm heel counter (stiff material on either side of the heel), adequate cushioning of the insole, and a built-in arch. It should be flexible enough to bend where the foot bends at the ball of the foot, not in the middle of the shoe.
  • Never try to force your child's feet to fit a pair of shoes.
  • Shoes should not slip off at the heels. Children who have a tendency to sprain their ankles will do better with high-top shoes or boots.

Children who frequently remove shoes from their feet may be signaling some discomfort. Check your child's feet periodically for signs of too-tight shoes, such as redness, calluses or blisters, which will help you know when they've outgrown their shoes.

Remember that the primary purpose of shoes is to prevent injury. Shoes seldom correct children's foot deformities or change a foot's growth pattern. Casting, bracing, or surgery may be needed if a serious deformity is present. If you notice a problem, please contact our office to have your child's feet examined.



 

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West Lawn Podiatry
Center for Foot & Ankle Care

25 Stevens Avenue

West Lawn, PA 19609

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